African American Voices and Stories

Rebecca Klempner

 

Thanks to my sister for pointing this gem out. “Since we’ve opened up the Whitney, many of these museum are changing scripts. Now they are willing to put slavery in. They were very successful doing the sort of Gone With the Wind type museum. But they have decided to tell the story of slavery. In the Houmas House, where you go and have a wedding for $30,000, they have been putting two ceramic slave children with a sign saying, “Please, if you want to hear the story of slavery, go to Whitney Plantation.” Now they are moving toward putting the story of slavery inside their own plantation.”
I’m a black daughter of the Confederacy, and this is how we should deal with all those General Lees Like millions of African Americans, I am the descendant of a Confederate soldier. Those bronzed soldiers on monuments to the Civil War are our forefathers too.

 

WHITE PRIVILEGE EXPLAINED:

https://onbeing.org/blog/what-i-said-when-my-white-friend-asked-for-my-black-opinion-on-white-privilege/

 

Àdísà Àjàmú

The process of transformation—which is different from change or growth-—is often ugly and uncomfortable in the beginning. The transition stage from where we are to where we want to be—whether it’s our hair, our bodies, our minds, our disposition or the current way in which we are situated in the world—is uncomfortable. And it’s meant to be. The beauty in the early stages comes from embracing the struggle in the transition; the comfort comes later in having achieved our goals and luxuriating in the wonders and the beauty of having become a new creation.

A common mistake many of us make is we are often more invested in being comfortable during the transition phase before we achieve anything to be comfortable about. (“I’ll eat this and then work it off tomorrow.” “I’m going natural but this weave will help with my transition.” “I’m not as much of womanizer as a I used to be.” “I’m just being real, if people cant accept me for who I am, its their problem”…) In reality, all that really says is that we are more committed to who we are than who we desire to be.

How can true growth or transformation be found in one cheating the one person we should be most committed to: Ourselves. If one cannot or is unwilling to demonstrate integrity to their commitment to themselves, one has to wonder what will the quality of their results and the sustainability of those results.

The transition process with all of its difficulties is the time to get to know who we are truly, to reexamine notions bequeathed to us about ugliness and beauty, about our worth and our values, about our identity and our consciousness, our beliefs, good and bad, and their origins, etc. What good is a beautyful natural head of healthy hair, if it shrouds a dead mind? What good is new found body beauty, if it houses the same toxic mentality about body image? What good does it do to be culturally conscious, if our behavior is still rooted in the pimpism of an enslaved mind?

The things that call for us now—the things that hold us down—the things we answer to are a function of who we are in this moment. That’s true even during our transition phase, especially during a transition phase. As we grow or transform ourselves those same things still call us, we are simply less and less aware of them because our capacity to hear them slowly decreases, until one day though we can see them we can no longer hear them at all.

If we don’t embrace the struggle of the transition on the road to growth and transformation, we may end up thinking we are free, confusing a bigger cage for freedom, while still being held hostage by old insecurities. Transitions are the place where you do battle with yourself for your best self; transformation is where you discover who emerged victorious. One of life’s great mysteries is why someone would choose to crawl when they can fly.

Black Love IS Black Power.

—Àdísà

 

Let’s learn from the past and from each other,

Shocking, brutal truth below,

Coach Yulia

 

Atlanta Black Star
Devastating stories we all need to know about.
The fertility of enslaved women was examined by owners to make sure they were able to birth as many children as possible. ATLANTABLACKSTAR.COM
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